Target recalls peaches after being linked to Salmonella outbreak

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Target is recalling peaches because of possible Salmonella contamination.

Minnesota state health and food safety officials are warning Minnesota consumers not to eat fresh, whole peaches supplied by Wawona Packing Company and purchased at retail locations including Aldi and Target after linking Salmonella infections to the produce.

The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) and Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA), along with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating a multi-state outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to consumption of peaches supplied by Wawona Packing Company. 

According to the MDH, ill people have reported purchasing peaches from Aldi, Target, and possibly other retail locations. On August 19, Aldi announced a recall of peaches from Wawona Packing Company, including both loose and bagged peaches. 

So far, there have been 68 reported cases of Salmonella Enteritidis resulting in 14 hospitalizations in 9 states.  — Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia and Wisconsin. The full CDC report can be read here.

Twenty-three residents of Minnesota have been identified as part of the outbreak. Those ill range in age between 3 and 92, with a median age of 28. Six patients were hospitalized but have all recovered.

Target is in the process of removing peaches from its stores.

Recalled products:

Target Item Number:

  • Target Item # 267-03-4038, Peach per pound; UPC # 492670340386
  • Target Item # 266-03-0010, Peach by the each; UPC # 204038000005
  • Target Item # 266-03-0002, 2 lb peach bag; UPC # 033383322056
  • Target Item # 267-50-4044, 2 lb organic peach; UPC # 849315000400
  • Target Item # 267-03-4405, White Peach per pound UPC # 492670344056

Target is in the process of removing peaches from its stores.

Customers who have purchased the peaches should not consume them and dispose of them immediately.

As of now,  23 residents of Minnesota have been identified as part of the outbreak. Those ill range in age between 3 and 92, with a median age of 28. The patients became ill between July 12 and Aug. 3.

About Salmonella infections
Food contaminated with Salmonella bacteria does not usually look, smell, or taste spoiled. Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection. Infants, children, seniors, and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are fragile, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has eaten any of the recalled onions and developed symptoms of Salmonella infection should seek medical attention. Sick people should tell their doctors about the possible exposure to Salmonella bacteria because special tests are necessary to diagnose salmonellosis. Salmonella infection symptoms can mimic other illnesses, frequently leading to misdiagnosis.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food. Otherwise, healthy adults are usually sick for four to seven days. In some cases, however, diarrhea may be so severe that patients require hospitalization.

Older adults, children, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients, are more likely to develop a severe illness and serious, sometimes life-threatening conditions.

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